Indistinct Musings

All the bits and pieces

1,167 notes

partylifestyle:

explore-blog:

Rudy’s Library in Monowi, Nebraska – one of the many soul-warming photographs in Robert Dawson’s visual love letter to public libraries:

The entire population of this town consists of one woman, Elsie Eller. It is the only incorporated municipality in the United States with such a demographic. She acts as mayor and runs the only business in town, a local roadhouse. Over the years she watched all the other town residents move or pass away. When her husband, Rudy Eller, died in 2004, she became the town’s last resident. Because Rudy had collected so many books, she decided to open Rudy’s lLIbrary in a small shed next to her home. This memorial to Rudy is free and open to all. Patrons can check out books by signing a notebook. A wooden sign in the corner simply states “Rudy’s Dream.”

More such treats here.

corx just emailed me this link and i wrote back that i want to move to monowi.

partylifestyle:

explore-blog:

Rudy’s Library in Monowi, Nebraska – one of the many soul-warming photographs in Robert Dawson’s visual love letter to public libraries:

The entire population of this town consists of one woman, Elsie Eller. It is the only incorporated municipality in the United States with such a demographic. She acts as mayor and runs the only business in town, a local roadhouse. Over the years she watched all the other town residents move or pass away. When her husband, Rudy Eller, died in 2004, she became the town’s last resident. Because Rudy had collected so many books, she decided to open Rudy’s lLIbrary in a small shed next to her home. This memorial to Rudy is free and open to all. Patrons can check out books by signing a notebook. A wooden sign in the corner simply states “Rudy’s Dream.”

More such treats here.

corx just emailed me this link and i wrote back that i want to move to monowi.

16 notes

kadportraits:

I absolutely had the best f***ing great weekend at HobbitCon in Bonn!
I considered going there because of just one dwarf-actor. Next year I’ll go because of all of them. They are such incredible entertainers - man, I wish I could go back in time!
=========
Wow, ich hatte das beste Wochenende überhaupt in Bonn auf der HobbitCon!
Eigentlich bin ich wegen nur einem Zwergendarsteller hingegangen. Nächstes Jahr werde ich wegen allen gehen! Die Schauspieler sind durchweg hervoragende Entertainer - es hat soviel Spaß gemacht, ich wünschte, ich könnte die Zeit zurückdrehen!

189,419 notes

the-treble:

cheriiiiiiiiiiiiiii:

derpycats:

Willow hasn’t quite mastered the concept of a cat door yet.

she looks so lost

It has been three days. The servants have rebelled and refuse me refuge in my castle. They point and laugh and take pictures while I have been reduced to grovelling to be let in. I fear this may be my last entry.

the-treble:

cheriiiiiiiiiiiiiii:

derpycats:

Willow hasn’t quite mastered the concept of a cat door yet.

she looks so lost

It has been three days. The servants have rebelled and refuse me refuge in my castle. They point and laugh and take pictures while I have been reduced to grovelling to be let in. I fear this may be my last entry.

(via laughterdiet)

3,486 notes

art-of-swords:

Handmade Swords - Earil

  • By Peter Lyon of Weta Workshop
  • Edition Size: 1
  • Measurements: Blade length: 915mm (36”). Overall length: 1217mm (48”). Weight: 1.94Kg (4 pounds 4 ounces). Balance point: 71mm (2.8”) along blade, measured from the shoulder of the blade

The sword has been made especially for the Weta Cave and Weta’s Online Shop to sell to the public. It is similar to late medieval European longswords, but with design flourishes transform it into a piece of art as well. A longsword is light enough and balanced to be used with one hand, but it can also be used two handed for powerful cutting blows. The blade is broad for much of its length, making for strong cuts, but comes to an acute point for effective thrusts, making this a true cut-and-thrust sword.

The individual parts have shapes and detail lines that blend into each other and continue into the next component, so that shapes continue even as the materials change, and the shapes of all the hilt parts draw the eye towards the diamond shaped bosses in the centre of the grip, filled with polished Paua (New Zealand abalone) shell each side. At the same time there is a strong central line through the hilt and along the blade, emphasising the straight and symmetrical shapes of the sword.

This sword has many nautical features which led me to the name, “Aearil”, which in Elvish means “Gleaming Ocean”. 

The straight blade is ground from spring steel bar, and has been heat treated to give the best possible combination of toughness and edge hardness. Historically blades were forged into shape and to remove flaws in the steel, but the consistency and high specifications of modern steels mean this is no longer necessary.

The bevelled edge is blunted for safety and display, but could just as easily be sharpened for cutting tests. The tang of the blade is strong and wide, and passes through the cross guard, grip and pommel, and is peened over the end of the pommel for maximum strength.

The cross guard is cut from a block of mild steel. From the centre block it projects along the blade and towards the ends, which are split into a fork. This is an unusual feature which I don’t recall being used on a sword before. The cross is set onto the shoulders of the blade for extra strength and stability, as was done on medieval European swords to prevent the cross becoming loose and rattling through use.

The grip is made of beech wood, covered with leather. Thin cords under the leather create the designs, and the leather has been carefully tooled to fit into all the shapes created by the cords. The grip was mostly drilled out then fitted by heating the tang and burning out the remaining wood for a tight fit, and finally glued in place. It is a two handed grip; the foregrip is straight to give a strong gripping surface, while the waisted shape of the upper grip encourages the second hand to nestle into the inside curves of the pommel.

The mild steel pommel is also a counterweight for the blade. It is shaped somewhat like a fish tail, with curved and recessed faces to add interesting shapes, and also to remove weight and get the best possible balance for the sword overall. The pommel was set tight onto the tapering tang before the end was peened over.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Weta Ltd.